TLTHE LATEST/17Oct14

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Young Designers at Holcombe Brook Excel at Logo Design Workshop

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The young designers at Holcombe Brook Primary get the school logo design process off to a flying start.

Holcombe Brook primary school are refreshing their school identity and rightly want their pupils to be integral to the process. So we created a half-day logo design workshop for the Year 5 pupils, to help us achieve this. We could discuss their thoughts and ideas, and in return introduce them to the logo design process and some tablet based professional design tools. The results were fantastic.

The Logo Workshop Format

The half-day program was intended to give the children a jam-packed introduction to the different aspects of the logo design process, while establishing ideas and preferences that could underpin the new logo design. Click the image below to view the workshop slideshow for more information about .

 

Logo design Workshop Presentation title slide with link to the full presentation.
 

The Results

We started with some discussion about what a logo is and what makes a good one, followed by a guess-the-logo quiz. After some initial brainstorming, the children then got straight into some concept sketching in black and white. Preferred black and white designs were then developed into colour.

Logo concept sketches in black and white.
 
Logo concept sketches in colour.


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To introduce new design tools and technology, best sketches were then converted into digital format, as if to ready for further refinement. This was done on iPad using a combination of Genius Scan and the Sketchbook Apps. We finished of with a collaborative review to help the children evaluate their work.
 

 

Analysis: Making use of the findings

The concept work can now be used to provide direction for the final design; by providing inspiration and by allowing better informed decisions. For example, the figure below summarises the most common elements featured across the complete set of B&W concept designs. This can help make better informed decisions on content. Despite ‘Brook’ being part of the school name, a river/brook only features twice and as such doesn’t seem particularly important to the children, when visually representing their school. The results also say that the pupils like to represent the school with a lot of different elements (nearly 6 per design, in addition to the tower and hill). Circle vs. Square (75:25) shaped design is another property with clear direction. Colour assessment may also be relevant for wider identity design, in order to create a picture of the school that best resonates with how the children view it, or would like to view it.

By using this analysis to guide subsequent design decisions, the children’s collective work here will become integral to the further designs.
 
Histogram showing the range and frequency of different elements featured across in the all logo concept designs.

 

I was so impressed with what the children achieved in the session. Undeterred by a challenging programme, the children applied themselves throughout, working well with the new software and each other, to produce some excellent results and get the project off to a flying start. The young designers in Mr. Bradshaw’s class are a credit to their school and they should be very proud of their contribution toward the new school logo. A top effort.